3. Practical advice and tips for carers > Driving and transport alternatives

Driving and transport alternatives

10) Air

Air travel can involve complex arrangements for anyone regardless of any disability. Airports and aircraft can present more problems for people after stroke.

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  • Fit to fly? You should check with your doctor that you are fit to fly especially if the stroke was less than four months before the date of travel. Some airlines may ask for a medical letter of fitness to travel.
  • At the airport. Consider the distances they will need to go from car parks and check in desk to departure and boarding. It is recommended that you contact your airline and the departure airport when booking to make certain you know what help will be arranged for you. At the destination airport you will have the same issues to consider.
  • Wheelchair users. If the person you care for is going to be using a wheelchair you must also take account of any luggage you will also have to handle. Some airlines allow passengers to take their own wheelchair up to the boarding gate and then transfer into a travel chair which is compact and can be used in a confined cabin area.
  • On the aircraft. Consider the length of the flight because once on board practical problems such as using an aircraft toilets may be impossible if the person has limited mobility or requires assistance.
  • Insurance. Make sure you have travel insurance which includes cover for any equipment including wheelchair.

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  • Fit to fly? You should check with your doctor that you are fit to fly especially if the stroke was less than four months before the date of travel. Some airlines may ask for a medical letter of fitness to travel.
  • At the airport. Consider the distances they will need to go from car parks and check in desk to departure and boarding. It is recommended that you contact your airline and the departure airport when booking to make certain you know what help will be arranged for you. At the destination airport you will have the same issues to consider.
  • Wheelchair users. If the person you care for is going to be using a wheelchair you must also take account of any luggage you will also have to handle. Some airlines allow passengers to take their own wheelchair up to the boarding gate and then transfer into a travel chair which is compact and can be used in a confined cabin area.
  • On the aircraft. Consider the length of the flight because once on board practical problems such as using an aircraft toilets may be impossible if the person has limited mobility or requires assistance.
  • Insurance. Make sure you have travel insurance which includes cover for any equipment including wheelchair.

Airline companies often have a service department for disabled travellers who need extra support or assistance. Contact the airline when making the booking to check what help they can provide.

Please see: CHSS leaflet: Air travel for those affected by Chest Heart and Stroke illness [.pdf].


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